New materials for the conservation of cultural heritage in concrete 23-24 April 2021

New materials for the conservation of cultural heritage in concrete 23-24 April 2021

INNOVACONCRETE ABRUZZO VIRTUAL WORKSHOP

WHEN: April 23-24, 2021.

WHERE: Online.

The Italian/English and English/Italian translation will be available.

The Workshop is address to: 

  • Conservation Professionals.
  • Professional Councils.
  • Students of Universities.
  • Specialty Craftsman and Restorers in Concrete Heritage.
  • Public Administrations.
  • Researchers working in Cultural Heritage conservation.
  • Conservation products manufacturers.

MORE INFO:

  • certificate of participation will be issued at the end of the webinar.
  • Credits for the Order of Engineers will be granted only to members of the Province of Chieti.

21st April – IPERION and E-RIHS Webinar – Know the program on Heritage Science

As we already announced, the first of a series of webinars on practical heritage science will being the April 21st. Organized by IPERION HS and E-RIHS:

«IPERION HS and E-RIHS are organizing a series of short and practical webinars, a key source of state-of-the-art information on #HeritageScience research, facilities, policy and impact. It contributes to the development of a vibrant heritage science community and is intended for anyone involved in interdisciplinary #heritage research. One short webinar per month! The typical length of a webinar will be 30 min, followed by Q&A.
Read the full IPERION HS Academy programme

See directly the programme here:

 

The first webinar will take place online on 21th April, 2021 at 10 am CET. Matija Strlič and Jana Striová will present what #HeritageScience is and how IPERION HS can answer heritage science research questions.
Registration is open: http://www.iperionhs.eu/webinar-registration/ «

Related content:

https://pti-pais.csic.es/webinar-what-is-iperion-hs/


22-25 March – Heritage Science Conference: Sustainable Heritage Bidecennial Conference: Strategic Research Questions

The UCL Institute of Sustainable Heritage celebrates 20 years and will host the Sustainable Heritage Bidecennial Conference. It will take place over four days from 22-25 March 2021, starting at 5 PM CET each day.

We recommend everybody interested in heritage science to assist to the sessions organized  the 24th, but see the full program here:   Conference program

The conference will be chaired by Prof Matija Strlic, Professor of Heritage Science.

 

The conference will be virtual and held on Zoom and it is free of charge.

Each day is related to a general topic.

It will also include some roundtables disccuions and two programmed workshops organised with Social Sciences & Humanities Open Cloud (SSHOC)

Citizen Science & Cultural Heritage – Planning for success | 24 March 12 am – 1pm (CET)

Digitising museum objects using basic photogrammetry | 25 March 12 am – 1 pm (CET)

 

If you look for more information click on the link below. There you can find all the conference sessions, speakers and times. Be aware that the times on the web are GMT +1.

Get the full information about this event here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/heritage/events/2021/mar/sustainable-heritage-bidecennial-conference-strategic-research-questions

Organized under the support of:


16th March, 2021 – JPI on Cultural Heritage launches his new Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA)

JPI on Cultural Heritage has released his new Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) and it would be presented in a virtual event – Kickoff & Networking Session with the presence of speakers from the European Comission and University College London.

This virtual event will be held the 16th March, 2021, the Kickoff and Networking even will begin at 10:00. To take part go to the next link and fullfill the contact form:

SRIA 2020 Virtual Launch

10 years after his first agenda, the SRIA shows the changes that have occured in the cultural heritage field. With SRIA 2020, the JPI CH will continue to provide future- orientated added value, and to protect and strengthen Europe’s cultural heritage through research and innovation in order to meet societal challenges and contribute to sustainable development.

You can obtain the agenda here:

The four Priority Areas stablished in this Agenda are:

  1. A reflective heritage for a resilient society: – This Priority Area focuses on cultural heritage as an empowering force and a collective good for society
  2. Sutainable management of cultural heritage. – This Priority Area focuses on participatory governance, the added value of cultural heritage and emerging technologies 
  3. Cultural heritage in a changing context. – This Priority Area focuses on urban and rural development, globalisation, demographic change and tourism and will explore both the positive and the negative implications for cultural heritage
  4. Cultural heritage facing climate change and environmental change. This Priority Area focuses on the impact of climate and environmental changes on cultural and natural heritage and how cultural and natural heritage could be as resource for Sustainable Development.

You can explore the themes included in these Priority Areas on the document. I hope it is of your interest. We left you with some words on cultural science from Pascal Liévaux, Chair of the JPI CH.

«The JPI CH has been a driving force in the creation of a new feld of study: heritage science. Heritage science is a very broad and totally transdisciplinary feld that brings together the wide range of sciences (social, experimental, engineering, digital, humanities) that participate in and enable the identifcation, understanding, conservation, restoration and transmission of heritage, be it cultural, tangible, intangible, digital or natural. It consists of a highly collaborative ecosystem of researchers, heritage professionals, non-governmental organisations and associations that transcends national visions and interests, whilst falling within the scope of Europe’s open science policy.(…)»   PASCAL LIÉVAUX – Chair of the JPI Cultural Heritage

 


Online Course: Climate Change and Risk Assessment for Cultural Heritage, 10th August 2020

An online course on climate change and risk assessment for cultural heritage is being offered by ICOMOS Argentina, La Plata City Foundation and the Heritage and Climate Change Initiative, within the framework of the «New approaches to cultural and natural heritage” programme. The first edition starts on 10 August 2020, and will be available in Spanish and Portuguese. The second edition of the course will begin in October and will also be available in English.

Professors: Arq. Guillermo R. García, Arq. M. Gabriela Santibañez, Arq. Mauro García Santa Cruz, Lic. Jimena García Santa Cruz

Guest Professors: Mr. Toshiyuki Kono, Mr. Peter Cox, Mr. Andrew Potts, Mr. Christopher Marrion, Mag. Arq. Pedro Delheye, Lic. Walter Di Santo, Dra. Stacy Vallis

Information and registration: http://patrimonio-cc.eventbrite.com
Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2805350249577394/
YouTube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpqrKeil8Xo

 

 


Webinar: Applying alkaline nanoparticles to deacidify alum-treated wood, 17 June 16:00 pm (GMT+1 London)

The Icon Book & Paper Group Committee are pleased to be able to bring you a series of live streamed talks while many people are required to stay at home during in these unprecedented times.

The next talk will be Susan Braovac & Fabrizio Andriulo giving their talk Applying alkaline nanoparticles to deacidify alum-treated wood.

Overview
Conservation of waterlogged archaeological wood using alum salts (potassium aluminum sulfate, ammonium aluminum sulfate) was a method used in the past to treat highly degraded wood. It was used on the Viking Age wooden finds from Oseberg, recovered in 1904 near Tønsberg, Norway. Today this wood is very acidic (pH ≤ 2), mainly due to the acid absorbed during the alum treatment. High acidity has caused the wood polymers to undergo a slow degradation over time. In order to slow down degradation, the research project Saving Oseberg investigates retreatment methods for these finds. In some cases retreatment cannot undergo water-based methods. For such objects, we are currently testing alkaline nanoparticles (calcium hydroxide in isopropanol) to deacidify the wood. We present a background of the alum method, facts about calcium hydroxide nanoparticles and show ongoing practical work using these.

About the speaker
Dr. Susan Braovac is an archaeological conservator in the research project Saving Oseberg (SO) at the Museum of Cultural History (2014-20). She has investigated the problems of alum-treated wood since the late 1990s. Dr. Fabrizio Andriulo is a conservation scientist who is a post-doctoral fellow in Saving Oseberg, and specializes in application of alkaline nanoparticles to acidic wood. Pia Kristina Edqvist is an archaeological conservator and joined the SO team in April 2020.

Date:17 jun 2020 04:00 PM (GMT+1)

Register here


Webinar: «Sustainability and Cultural Heritage: Our Past and Our Future», 10 June 16:00 pm (GMT+1)

The Icon Book & Paper Group Committee are pleased to be able to bring you a series of live streamed talks while many people are required to stay at home during in these unprecedented times.

The next talk will be Caitline Southwick giving their talk Sustainability and Cultural Heritage: Our Past and Our Future

Overview
Sustainability is a global issue. As realities surrounding climate change and social injustice become more apparent and hit closer to home, people are ready to do something about it. But what does cultural heritage have to do with climate change? How do museums impact social justice? Why do conservators need to learn how to think green in their practice? This webinar will outline what sustainability means to cultural heritage and what unique opportunities the sector has to engage with and promote sustainability – resulting in holistic change and contributing to a sustainable future for all.

About the speaker
Caitlin Southwick (MSc, PD) is the Founder and Executive Director of Ki Culture and Sustainability in Conservation. She has over eight years of international training and experience in the conservation field. Her interest in sustainability derived from her personal passion for the environment and she believes strongly in the duality of conserving cultural heritage and the planet. She is a former professional member of the American Institute for Conservation’s Sustainability Committee and is the current Secretary of the Sustainability Working Group for the International Council of Museums.

Date:10 jun 2020 04:00 PM (GMT+1)